The British Archaeological Awards are a showcase for the best in UK archaeology and a central event in the archaeological calendar. Established in 1976, they now encompass six Awards, covering every aspect of UK archaeology.

For guidance on the 2012 Awards or any other query please contact the Administrator.

BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL AWARDS 2012

Announced on 9 July, British Museum, London.

The winners and highly commended nominations for each Award are given below.

Photographs and videos from the Awards ceremony are also available.


Best Archaeological Project

For a programme of research advancing the knowledge and practice of archaeology in the UK

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Contribution to knowledge of the past in the UK by archaeological means
  • Strong research focus
  • Commitment to high archaeological standards and ethics as, for example, set out by the Institute for Archaeologists in its various public documents (http://www.archaeologists.net/codes/ifa)
  • Approaches designed to promote public education and benefit
  • Demonstrated effective dissemination and presentation, including commitment to publication and archiving
  • Innovation and originality of approach, methodology and/or presentation

Winner: Must Farm Palaeochannel Excavations 2011, Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire – Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge

Highly commended:

Best Community Archaeology Project

For a programme of research advancing the knowledge and practice of archaeology in the UK

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Project should be driven by amateur archaeologists and/or societies and should involve the local community, including new audiences, throughout to enhance public education
  • Contribution to knowledge of archaeology in the UK
  • Strong research focus
  • Commitment to recognised professional standards and ethics as, for example, set out by the Institute for Archaeologists in its various public documents (http://www.archaeologists.net/codes/ifa)
  • Effective dissemination and presentation throughout the project, including commitment to publication and archiving
  • Innovation and originality of approach, methodology and/or presentation

Winner: Thames Discovery Programme

Highly commended:

Best Archaeological Book

For a book publication which increases understanding of the past and introduces it to new audiences

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Contribution to knowledge and advancement of archaeology
  • Clear and stimulating style
  • Presentation/design and production standards
  • Accessibility, attracting a wider audience
  • Originality of approach and/or subject matter

Winner: Gathering Time: Dating the Early Neolithic Enclosures of Southern Britain and Ireland by Alasdair Whittle, Frances Healy and Alex Bayliss. Published by Oxbow Books.

Highly commended:

  • Great Excavations: Shaping the Archaeological Profession edited by John Schofield. Published by Oxbow Books.
  • The Thames through Time series of four volumes by Anthony Morigi, Danielle Schreve, Mark White, Gill Hey, Paul Garwood, Mark Robinson, Alistair Barclay, Philippa Bradley, Geoge Lambrick, Tim Allen, Paul Booth, Alex Smith and Anne Dodd, Series editor Anne Dodd. Published by Oxford Archaeology.

Best Representation of Archaeology in the Media

For a television or radio programme, ICT program or web site, newspaper or magazine feature which stimulates interest, advances understanding and changes perceptions of the past

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Contribution to spreading knowledge of archaeology
  • Includes recent research or provides a new interpretation of old research
  • Enhances public education and understanding in relation to archaeology
  • Clear and stimulating presentation
  • High design, production and editorial standards
  • Accessibility and appeal for its intended audience
  • Originality of approach

Winner: Time Team, Series 18, Episode 1, Reservoir Rituals, Tottiford, Devon – Videotext Communications Ltd

Highly commended:

Best Archaeological Discovery

For a discovery which advances understanding and stimulates public imagination of the past

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Contribution to knowledge of archaeology in the UK
  • Commitment to recognised professional standards and ethics for recovering and reporting the discovery and subsequent dissemination
  • Quality of collaboration with others
  • A project which captures the public’s imagination

Winner: Must Farm Palaeochannel Excavations 2011, Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire – Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge

Highly commended:

Best Archaeological Innovation

For an initiative likely to lead to significant improvements in archaeological practice which facilitate new perceptions of the past

Judges were looking for evidence of the following:

  • Contribution to knowledge or to dissemination of knowledge of archaeology in the UK
  • Strong research focus
  • Effective dissemination and presentation
  • Excellence in project design, experimental technique, imaginative investigations, innovative solutions, resourcefulness

Winner: The Grey Literature Library: Geospatial Search and Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignment – Archaeology Data Service

Highly commended:

Lifetime Achievement Award

BAA trustees also have the option of awarding a Lifetime Achievement Award to an individual who has, over their working life has:

  • Made a substantial contribution to our knowledge of archaeology
  • Demonstrated originality of approach, methodology and presentation
  • Shown commitment to recognised professional standards and ethics
  • Been effective in dissemination and presentation of research
  • Supported and inspired colleagues, students or members of the public

A Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Professor Mick Aston Other projects of merit may be recognised at the discretion of the trustees of the British Archaeological Awards. A presentation recognising a project of special merit was made to representatives from Operation Nightingale: a ground-breaking archaeology project on Salisbury Plain which helps aid the rehabilitation of soldiers from The Rifles who have been injured on operations in Afghanistan.

RT @InstituteArch: We'd like to congratulate all the winners and runners up at yesterdays British Archaeological Awards ceremony @BAAWARDSUK
RT @AmandaFeath: Wonderful people make great archaeological projects. A great celebration of both today with @CarenzaLewis @BAAWARDSUK http…
RT @Nathalie_Cohen: Very excited for @KnoleNT to have won Best Archaeological Project @BAAWARDSUK! https://t.co/QBiA92qJtj
RT @ThamesDiscovery: Congratulations to our colleagues at @CITiZAN1 and @MOLArchaeology for winning @BAAWARDSUK, and to our friends @KnoleN
RT @MOLArchaeology: We are so excited that #LondonMithraeum @Bloomberg SPACE has has been recognised with the British Archaeological Award…
Congratulations to all the winners at this evening’s .⁦@BAAWARDSUK⁩ from the Trustees & compère .⁦@CarenzaLewis⁩. T… https://t.co/t7YGezszEP
We have every reason to be optimistic says Carenza Lewis our compère for the awards this evening https://t.co/qH8NRhvR1s
Well done everyone. You are all amazing! https://t.co/lQMiWvALrt
RT @allisonl: @BAAWARDSUK winners for best public display of Archeology is the London Mithreaum Bloomberg SPACE #baawards https://t.co/aQtP…
RT @CoastArch: Wow... Joint winners, with @CITiZAN1 of the BAA best community project award!!! https://t.co/0n1pxd8g7A